Achievements

Hectares of rainforest saved

104

Hectares of rainforest saved

tCO2e kept from the atmosphere

6,476

Tonnes of CO2e kept from the atmosphere

25 species assessed for extinction risk for the first time

25

Species assessed for extinction risk for the first time

Conservation news

Horned Marsupial-Frog still alive in Ecuador

Horned Marsupial-Frog still alive in Ecuador
November 2018

Atelopus palmatus shows up!
July 2018

5 new species of snail-sucking snakes

5 new species of threatened snail-sucking snakes named to save rainforest in Ecuador
June 2018

Projects

Rapid-Response Discovery of Rainfrogs

Ecuador, Colombia, Peru, and Venezuela.

$9,098 funded of $200,000.

The goal of this project is to speed up the rate at which new Pristimantis rainfrogs are discovered and protected and ultimately help the Latin American scientific community describe 500 species of Pristimantis in 10 years.

There are 532 recognized species of rainfrogs, including the Emerald Rainfrog (Pristimantis galdi). Photo by Alejandro Arteaga.

More than 500 species of rainfrogs remain undiscovered. The majority of them live in cloudforests in the Andes of Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Pictured above is the Shape-shifting Rainfrog (Pristimantis mutabilis), discovered in Ecuador in 2015. Photo by Alejandro Arteaga.

37% of all Pristimantis are threatened with extinction. The Ornate Rainfrog (Pristimantis ornatissimus) is one of them. Photo by Alejandro Arteaga.

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Save the Chocó

Canandé and Buenaventura reserves, Ecuador.

$50,953 funded of $500,000.

The goal of this project is to provide funding and scientific guidance to purchase and protect 1,000 hectares of rainforest in the Ecuadorian Chocó region. This land will be incorporated into Fundación Jocotoco's system of reserves under the flag of the Save the Chocó project.

About 19.2% of the Chocó rainforest in Ecuador remains. Photo by Lucas Bustamante.

There are 92 species of amphibians in the Ecuadorian Chocó rainforest, including the Ghost Glassfrog (Sachatamia ilex). Photo by Alejandro Arteaga.

There are 122 species of reptiles in the Ecuadorian Chocó rainforest, including the Northern Eyelash-Boa (Trachyboa boulengeri). Photo by Frank Pichardo.

Nearly 25,000 hectares of Chocó rainforest are destroyed every year in Ecuador. Photo by Lucas Bustamante.

In Ecuador, the Chocó rainforest is destroyed and transformed into cattle pastures and palm-oil plantations. Photo by Lucas Bustamante.

The destruction of rainforests causes major losses in biodiversity and releases tonnes of CO2 into the atmosphere. Photo by Jorge Castillo.

The Tropical Herping team explores pristine rainforest areas to gather scientific evidence and graphic material to help Fundación Jocotoco choose the most important plots of land to save. Photo by Jorge Castillo.

As of october 2019, Tropical Herping has gathered and provided funding to protect 97 hectares of pristine Chocó rainforest. Photo by Lucas Bustamante.

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Guardians of the Pinocchio Lizard

Mindo, Ecuador.

The goal of this project is to restore the populations of the endangered Pinocchio Anole (Anolis proboscis) by identifying and creating areas where this endemic species is safe from poaching and habitat loss and degradation.

The Pinocchio Anole (Anolis proboscis) is one of Ecuador's most imperiled reptile species. It was thought to be extinct for nearly fifty years. Photo by Alejandro Arteaga.

Female of the Pinocchio Anole (Anolis proboscis). Photo by Alejandro Arteaga.

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